Trading Info

CFDs: A Quick Introduction

CFDs (Contracts for Difference) allows online traders to speculate on the rising or falling prices of fast-moving global financial markets or instruments such as shares, indices, ETFs, commodities, currencies, cryptocurrencies and bonds. CFDs involve the same trading practices as the actual ownership of the underlying assets, but when trading CFDs traders do not own those assets. Traders can buy or sell a number of units of a particular instrument depending on whether they assume that prices will go up or down, and the difference between the opening price and the closing price is the profit or the loss values.

CFDs (Contracts for Difference) allows online traders to speculate on the rising or falling prices of fast-moving global financial markets or instruments such as shares, indices, ETFs, commodities, currencies, cryptocurrencies and bonds. CFDs involve the same trading practices as the actual ownership of the underlying assets, but when trading CFDs traders do not own those assets. Traders can buy or sell a number of units of a particular instrument depending on whether they assume that prices will go up or down, and the difference between the opening price and the closing price is the profit or the loss values.

CFDs (Contracts for Difference) allows online traders to speculate on the rising or falling prices of fast-moving global financial markets or instruments such as shares, indices, ETFs, commodities, currencies, cryptocurrencies and bonds. CFDs involve the same trading practices as the actual ownership of the underlying assets, but when trading CFDs traders do not own those assets. Traders can buy or sell a number of units of a particular instrument depending on whether they assume that prices will go up or down, and the difference between the opening price and the closing price is the profit or the loss values

CFDs (Contracts for Difference) allows online traders to speculate on the rising or falling prices of fast-moving global financial markets or instruments such as shares, indices, ETFs, commodities, currencies, cryptocurrencies and bonds. CFDs involve the same trading practices as the actual ownership of the underlying assets, but when trading CFDs traders do not own those assets. Traders can buy or sell a number of units of a particular instrument depending on whether they assume that prices will go up or down, and the difference between the opening price and the closing price is the profit or the loss values.

CFDs (Contracts for Difference) allows online traders to speculate on the rising or falling prices of fast-moving global financial markets or instruments such as shares, indices, ETFs, commodities, currencies, cryptocurrencies and bonds. CFDs involve the same trading practices as the actual ownership of the underlying assets, but when trading CFDs traders do not own those assets. Traders can buy or sell a number of units of a particular instrument depending on whether they assume that prices will go up or down, and the difference between the opening price and the closing price is the profit or the loss values

Example:

Rather than buying 1000 shares of Apple on the brokerage site, the trader decides to buy 1000 CFDs of Apple shares on the Ainvesting trading platform. In case of Apple shares sell-off, and they drop by $4 in price, the trader will incur a loss of $4000. In case of an increase in Apple shares by $4 per share, the trader will receive a profit of $4,000 in the same way as if he has bought the actual shares of Apple.

Order Execution Policy
Trading CFDs involves significant risk of loss. CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 65.5% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.